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Posts tagged with ‘racism’

Black is beautiful. White is beautiful and every other color in between is also beautiful. :)

Asked by Anonymous

odinsblog:

afrogrrrlxvx:

jayjsupremacy:

lookatthewords:

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I dunnoooo I think you already know that “White is beautiful” don’t you?

Or will it shatter your beauty if I recognize mine?

WELL DAMN

Perfect.

Straight up dedicating this post to allergictofeeling who so exemplifies this post by reblogging a post about Nicki Minaj  image then tagged it “no need to play the race card

please keep your self centered ignorance, micro-agressions and derailing all to yourself

elizajumel:

the first female chinese immigrant to america was a sixteen-year-old girl who was part of a cultural exhibit where she sat in a life-size diorama and people watched her eat with chopsticks while wearing silk clothes and that’s really all you need to know about the commodification of chinese women

"The first Chinese immigrant woman, Afong Moy, was brought to New York in 1834 as a showpiece to satisfy the curiosity of the American public. From the mid-19th century to the early 20th century, because of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and much discriminatory legislation, Chinese women could only emigrate as wives or daughters of merchants and U.S. citizens. Thus, very few Chinese women came to the United States." [x]

(via wretchedoftheearth)

Sassy, or How to Make Black Women’s Anger and Pain a Joke

soflyniggaswannastalkme:

A lot of Black girls in general understand that they don’t like the word sassy being applied to them, and the reason I see most often cited is that it’s a stereotype that is liberally applied to just about anything resembling a one-liner or a quip.

But there’s another reason that I hate the word sassy for…

Its purpose is to diminish the pain and anger of Black girls. I didn’t realize I was looking at it right in the face until I started polling the situations in which Black girls are called sassy.

First, I should explain that sassy and sass have two different meanings in modern context. “Sassy” is the positive version of “sass”. Everyone wants to be friends with a “sassy Black girl” but no one wants to be friends with someone who sasses. “To sass” = bad. “Sassy”…supposedly a compliment.

And were it applied to people who could tell a great yo mama joke on the concrete playground, I’d be cool with it. But more often than not, it’s applied to Black women who retort (smartly) to angering situations, painful situations, or flat out tragic situations.

I’ve said many times that the only people who are allowed to cry and break down in public are white people, and that Black people are not afford that, much less Black women, which is why any view of tragedy and pain that is determined by how much one breaks down in public is inherently racist. Because of that, new techniques of coping had to be developed, one that is common in white people and recognized in white psychiatry but somehow completely ignored in the discussion of the “sassy Black girl”, using comedy to hide pain. This is common, because Black women have been told loud and clear that their pain is illegitimate, unwanted, and intolerable. So even amongst ourselves, we quip instead.

Look at Antoine Dodson and Sweet Brown. Pain for entertainment. Black people are a show, and the lowest points of our lives are the highlight of your Tuesday night after work while you gulp down another glass of wine.

When white people joke to hide pain, it’s sad, it’s deserving of consideration. Black people are just funny. Because they aren’t believed to HAVE pain.

If you find yourself confused about why a Black girl who says she’s triggered is still throwing one-liners or quipping? It’s because that’s a reaction that Black girls tend to have! Chances are, the more sassy your Black girl, the more you’re hurting her and the more she finds she can’t stop but say something because if she doesn’t, she’ll break down in public and she knows she can’t afford to do that.

So quit calling Black girls sassy. It’s nothing but a sign that you find their pain funny.

(Source: the-original-dtwps)

thatalbanianguy:

ianthe:

feminismisahatemovement:

Feminism.

as reblogged from “feminism is a hate movement” lol this comic is so asinine do i even need to take the time to show how flawed it is

KKK members are members of a privileged group committing and promoting violence against marginalized people. these generalizations promote hate and suppression

a woman making a generalization about men is a member of a marginalized group making a statement about a privileged group, and this statement is not done to incite violence against men (most feminists distance themselves from so-called “radical feminists” who WOULD advocate for wanton violence against all men) but rather as a protective lens through which to process the world and protect herself

then again, you did say “social justice” and not social justice, so maybe in your twisted world this is what “social justice” is

So in other words, women are weak little beings that need the protection of men. I mean, fuck, it’s not like women are more than 50% of the population and of the voting populace or anything. Nah, they’re as marginalized as black people are, right? God, you’re a racist AND a sexist. A+
Also you can make the EXACT same argument for the KKK member that you can for the woman. That they’re both afraid of people they consider to be violent.

But forget all that. Tell me something. Is the first one racist and the second one sexist? Or is one a survival mechanism while the other is simply hateful?

actually i’m not gonna forget all that lmao

aight here have some stats that yr probably gonna immediately give me some bullshit reason as to why you refuse to believe them bc yr a misogynist

  • 1 in 5 women have been the victim of rape or attempted rape
  • every 90 seconds someone somewhere is being sexually assaulted
  • 63.84% of women who reported being raped, physically assaulted, and/or stalked since age 18 were victimized by a current or former husband, cohabiting partner, boyfriend, or date
  • 93% of juvenile sexual assault victims know their attacker
  • The Campus Sexual Assault Study estimated that between 1 in 4 and 1 in 5 college women experience completed or attempted rape during their college years
  • sexual violence and gender based violence is associated with a host of short- and long-term problems, including physical injury and illness, psychological symptoms, economic costs, and death
  • 15 out of 16 rapists will walk free
  • boys who witness their fathers’ violence are 10 times more likely to engage in spouse abuse in later adulthood than boys from non-violent homes.

i love when people think that being able to vote somehow means you have institutional power wow

re: “as marginalized as black people are” 

uh

are you saying that black women aren’t people? because that’s actually what you’re saying. 

Also you can make the EXACT same argument for the KKK member that you can for the woman. That they’re both afraid of people they consider to be violent. 

except that one is based on actual statistics, rape culture and understanding that the system protects people with the upper hand in power dynamics and the other one is straight up racist

unless you’re about to give me some proof that statistically speaking black people are more likely to commit violent crimes against white people and that it’s statistically probable that white people will be victims of violence by black people in their lives 

in which case please, please bring it on because i would love to see you argue that and pretend you aren’t a racist dirtbag

Is the first one racist and the second one sexist?

the first one is racist and the second one isn’t sexist because women don’t have privilege over men in a patriarchal society so their prejudices have no institutionalized backing that perpetuates the oppression of men. men are afraid women will laugh at them. women are afraid men will kill them. (did you forget about elliot rodger so quickly?)

Or is one a survival mechanism while the other is simply hateful?

see above

i look forward to your responses and derailing!!

blvkahn:

ki0kuu:

yesindeedington:

aroyalmind:

fuckit-impaidd:

holymami:

lyriciss:

sh0rtybangbang:

timeforlightss:

chantycole:

iggatine:

teddythemonster:

untouchmyhair:

teddythemonster:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

cultureunseen:

Tea Party Comix 

They really don’t care about us…

RACISM

this genuinely hurt.. they really tried it

but let it go right

published in 2010 though
not the 50’s

they published 3 editions of full comic books like this……..

Amerikkka

I didn’t even want to reblog this… But y’all have to be educated… This is how they feel about us…. “They” as in, whomever feels this way about “us”.

2010 !?

Wowww smfh 😲😒

Never forget what country we’re in and how a lot of these people “in power” view us.

my heart hurts

Man..

2010

ignorance.

Wow

What made this even more hurtful was the fact it was published in 2010…as in 4 years ago. Sad.

JESUS FUCKING CHRIST.

(via knottydreadlocks)

thesoftghetto:

racebending:

chosengamer:

jamietheignorantamerican:

Go Forth and Educate Yourselves!

I’d also highly recommend watching the Jane Elliot Brown-eye/Blue-eye experiments, which can be found here:

Not only should you educate yourself but use this for good. Look around you and help others who don’t have this privilege. Hiring, donating, community service, etc.

After this post went viral, the original artist had to delete their tumblr because they were inundated with death threats.

There were people more offended by this comic than offended by the existence of racial disparities—to the point where they threatened this artist’s life.

Are you for real? Jesus…

frighteningfeminist:

doulaness:

Just stumbled upon this tweet from February: Neil calling out Mental Floss for lightening his skin.

I saw that magazine in mothers market I wanted to throw all the things. unfortunately I am not surprised when this happens to women of color, especially women in the entertainment industry, but for them to do this to a man who makes a living on his BRAIN and sheer intelligence really shocks me. This is how far racism and anti-blackness in the media will go. This far.

(via stfueverything)

TEN THINGS EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT RACE | PBS

teamocorazon:

smittened:

america-wakiewakie:

Our eyes tell us that people look different. No one has trouble distinguishing a Czech from a Chinese. But what do those differences mean? Are they biological? Has race always been with us? How does race affect people today?

There’s less - and more - to race than meets the eye:

1. Race is a modern idea. Ancient societies, like the Greeks, did not divide people according to physical distinctions, but according to religion, status, class, even language. The English language didn’t even have the word ‘race’ until it turns up in 1508 in a poem by William Dunbar referring to a line of kings.

2. Race has no genetic basis. Not one characteristic, trait or even gene distinguishes all the members of one so-called race from all the members of another so-called race.

3. Human subspecies don’t exist. Unlike many animals, modern humans simply haven’t been around long enough or isolated enough to evolve into separate subspecies or races. Despite surface appearances, we are one of the most similar of all species.

4. Skin color really is only skin deep. Most traits are inherited independently from one another. The genes influencing skin color have nothing to do with the genes influencing hair form, eye shape, blood type, musical talent, athletic ability or forms of intelligence. Knowing someone’s skin color doesn’t necessarily tell you anything else about him or her.

5. Most variation is within, not between, “races.” Of the small amount of total human variation, 85% exists within any local population, be they Italians, Kurds, Koreans or Cherokees. About 94% can be found within any continent. That means two random Koreans may be as genetically different as a Korean and an Italian.

6. Slavery predates race. Throughout much of human history, societies have enslaved others, often as a result of conquest or war, even debt, but not because of physical characteristics or a belief in natural inferiority. Due to a unique set of historical circumstances, ours was the first slave system where all the slaves shared similar physical characteristics.

7. Race and freedom evolved together. The U.S. was founded on the radical new principle that “All men are created equal.” But our early economy was based largely on slavery. How could this anomaly be rationalized? The new idea of race helped explain why some people could be denied the rights and freedoms that others took for granted.

8. Race justified social inequalities as natural. As the race idea evolved, white superiority became “common sense” in America. It justified not only slavery but also the extermination of Indians, exclusion of Asian immigrants, and the taking of Mexican lands by a nation that professed a belief in democracy. Racial practices were institutionalized within American government, laws, and society.

9. Race isn’t biological, but racism is still real. Race is a powerful social idea that gives people different access to opportunities and resources. Our government and social institutions have created advantages that disproportionately channel wealth, power, and resources to white people. This affects everyone, whether we are aware of it or not.

10. Colorblindness will not end racism. Pretending race doesn’t exist is not the same as creating equality. Race is more than stereotypes and individual prejudice. To combat racism, we need to identify and remedy social policies and institutional practices that advantage some groups at the expense of others.

RACE - The Power of an Illusion was produced by California Newsreel in association with the Independent Television Service (ITVS). Major funding provided by the Ford Foundation and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Diversity Fund.

q

YES YES YES!

(Source: america-wakiewakie, via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

Today In Black History: February 2, 1948

  • President Truman sent Congress a special message urging adoption of a civil rights program, including a fair employment practices commission and anti-lynching and anti-poll tax measures.

http://www.yale.edu/glc/archive/972.htm

In his message, President Truman wrote:

Today, the American people enjoy more freedom and opportunity than ever before. Never in our history has there been better reason to hope for the complete realization of the ideals of liberty and equality.

We shall not, however, finally achieve the ideals for which this Nation was founded so long as any American suffers discrimination as a result of his race, or religion, or color, or the land of origin of his forefathers.

Unfortunately, there still are examples—flagrant examples—of discrimination which are utterly contrary to our ideals. Not all groups of our population are free from the fear of violence. Not all groups are free to live and work where they please or to improve their conditions of life by their own efforts. Not all groups enjoy the full privileges of citizenship and participation in the government under which they live.

We cannot be satisfied until all our people have equal opportunities for jobs, for homes, for education, for health, and for political expression, and until all our people have equal protection under the law.

So, how are we doing, President Truman?

JOBS: 

A 2003 study found that whites with felonies were more likely to be called for interviews than black applicants without criminal records. The results of this study suggest that black men must work at least twice as hard as equally qualified whites simply to overcome the stigma of their skin color. 

The unemployment rate among black people is about double that among whites, as it has been for most of the past six decades.(1 & 2)

HOMES: 

Black families are 7x more likely than whites to end up in the shelter system, according to The Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness. (3)

EDUCATION:

Children of color face harsher discipline, disproportionate referrals to special education classes, and are more likely to fall victim to the school-to-prison pipeline than their white peers. Black boys are 3x more likely to be suspended or expelled from school than their white peers and 2.5x LESS likely to be enrolled in gifted and talented programs, even if their prior achievement reflects the ability to succeed. 

Schools are more segregated now than 40 years ago.(345)

HEALTH: 

According to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, “Despite the existence of civil rights legislation equal treatment and equal access are not a reality for racial/ethnic minorities and women in the current climate of the health care industry. Many barriers limit both the quality of health care and utilization for these groups.” Whites are more likely to receive more, and more thorough, diagnostic work and better treatment and care than people of color — even when controlling for income, education, and insurance.(6)

POLITICAL EXPRESSION:

A number of proposed voter ID laws across the states disproportionately affect and exclude black people, and even more so if they are poor or female. In 2013, the Supreme Court struck down the heart of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which contained a coverage formula that Congress has used to monitor states with a history of discrimination. Attorney General Eric Holder said the decision is “a serious setback for voting rights.” 

(7 & 8)

EQUAL LEGAL PROTECTION:

Despite the fact that whites engage in drug offenses at a higher rate than African Americans, African Americans are incarcerated on drug charges at a rate that is 10 times greater than that of whites. The War on Drugs disproportionately gives “felon” labels to African Americans and opens the door to legal discrimination that can no longer be overtly based on race.

(9 & 10)

Asian-Americans aren't white and nor are they a majority. And yet not only have they done well, they have done better than whites when it comes to employment and income. How could they have done this if the whole system was based on securing white privilege?

yellowperilprincess:

thisiswhiteprivilege:

Model minority myth. Congrats! You’re a racist.

Dear White people who try to use Asian-Americans to justify or dismiss systemic racism:

Shut up and fucking educate yourself, you racist pile of soiled diapers.

Here’s some reading material:

http://sociology101.net.cnchost.com/readings/Myth-Of-The-Model-Minority.pdf

http://feministing.com/2012/06/26/five-ways-the-myth-of-the-model-minority-hurts-us/ (I don’t normally like Feministing as they often fail to recognize intersectionality but this article is good)

http://diverseeducation.com/article/53790/#

http://www.policymic.com/articles/76097/why-young-asian-americans-are-fleeing-hollywood

http://www.xojane.com/issues/fat-for-an-asian-the-pressure-to-be-naturally-perfect

http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1243&context=crsj

shut up with your ‘good colored folk’ vs ‘bad colored folk’ shit and educate yourself

one of my really good friends at school wrote this for our school's newspaper, The Chronicle. Even though you're not black, I think you would appreciate this article. Pass it along! m(.)dukechronicle(.)com/articles/2014/01/17/tongues-tired-dancing

Asked by laterz-baby

I love this! Thanks!

http://www.dukechronicle.com/articles/2014/01/17/tongues-tired-dancing

You are the daughter of a post-racial society. Yet your brother is bullied in his middle school where he is one of a few black students. He is called a n——- and told that he looks like a black hobo. When he reaches out to his teachers for help, they dismiss him and assume that he has somehow provoked these microaggressions that, in truth, don’t feel that micro.

But maybe, maybe you’re just making it up. Maybe it’s not that bad. Maybe it’s you who cannot transcend difference. Maybe if you stop talking about racism, it will go away. Just like if you stop talking about sexism, it will go away. Doesn’t silence make things go away? Maybe meritocracy is real. Maybe what Moynihan named the “tangle of pathology” does not obscure the histories of social, political and economic exploitation and marginalization of peoples of color. Maybe if black people just tried harder to extricate themselves from it, we’d be OK. Besides, did not Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream come into fruition after his tragic death? Did not the shedding of his blood wipe away the United States’ transgressions perpetuating oppression?

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